Perspectives: Local
The Book is Dead - Long Live the Book Print E-mail
By Dr Sherman Young   

Abstract

Sherman Young shares with us the written version of his recent presentation at the joint SLAV/Curriculum Corporation Conference on the 14th of August 2009. This presentation discusses the history of how we have conveyed information, the role of the internet and web 2.0 and the future of the book. Young’s discussion is based on his 2007 publication The Book is Dead, Long Live the Book (UNSW Press).

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Student Engagement in Learning and Teaching Print E-mail
By Daniel Boase-Jelinek   

Abstract

How shall we engage the students of 2015 in learning and teaching? In this exploration of student engagement, a model is proposed to help answer this question. The model is based on the idea that students are engaged when their emotional, behavioural and cognitive processes are all activated to achieve a learning outcome. Engagement is diminished when any one or more of these elements is missing; students not emotionally engaged are probably bored, students not behaviourally engaged are passive, and students not cognitively engaged are simply memorising facts. When all three elements are activated we can be confident that students are engaged in learning.
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Collaboration or co-blab-oration Print E-mail

Abstract

Dr Gibson-Langford explores the power of collaboration to positively influence learning. In so doing she considers the difficulties inherent in creating an effective collaborative model. Gibson-Langford’s own experience suggests an approach built upon an action research model can facilitate the process of worthwhile collaboration and improve both learning outcomes and the satisfaction to be had from the experience.
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Where are the girls? The gender digital divide and professional IT Print E-mail
By Janice Todd   

Abstract

Girls avoid studying computer science and information technology at both secondary and tertiary levels and, as a result, women are under-represented in professional IT careers. This paper examines the complex causes of the gender digital divide and discusses its social consequences. Recognition of the phenomenon and initiatives at school library, classroom and wider school level will help to address the problem, but the way to significantly increase girls’ participation in IT professions is through a long term, systematic and coordinated approach to curriculum change across all levels of education.
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